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Hi! Just need a little advice.

Hey everyone,

Just decided to pop in here to hopefully get a little direction on how to improve my game. I'm sort of at the point with my play where I'm getting the fundamental mechanics of how to string combos together, a little about what's safe and what's not, and academically what some of the common terms mean and why they're important (footsies, zoning, 50/50, etc.). I'm starting to see the "other side" of fighting games where I can appreciate mindgames between skilled players, but I'm just having trouble figuring out how to get to a level of play that I can meaningfully participate in that. I know that getting into practice mode and grinding out big combo strings isn't going to get me very far, so what kind of things can I work on to help build a more practical skillset?

Really grateful for anyone's insight :) Cheers!
 

Dreamcatcher

EFL Founder
Hey everyone,

Just decided to pop in here to hopefully get a little direction on how to improve my game. I'm sort of at the point with my play where I'm getting the fundamental mechanics of how to string combos together, a little about what's safe and what's not, and academically what some of the common terms mean and why they're important (footsies, zoning, 50/50, etc.). I'm starting to see the "other side" of fighting games where I can appreciate mindgames between skilled players, but I'm just having trouble figuring out how to get to a level of play that I can meaningfully participate in that. I know that getting into practice mode and grinding out big combo strings isn't going to get me very far, so what kind of things can I work on to help build a more practical skillset?

Really grateful for anyone's insight :) Cheers!
The best way (imo) to get better the fastest pace you can is to play against other players. Just play, play, play, play until your eyes bleed. The more different skill levels and fighting styles, the better. You will naturally learn to adapt to specific situations you wouldn't otherwise encounter or think of until they actually happen. You'll start to discover your bad habits and also learn how to exploit similar habits of others. It might suck at first, but it's usually best to consistently play someone noticeably better than you even though it's really tough at first.

I remember over a decade ago when I thought I was the shit. Then I found out about some MK website and found all these (high level) players on different platforms that I started to play against. Finally once I set my ego aside and realized that I'm going to get my ass kicked here and there, but I'm going to get better. You know why? If you make mistakes, you learn from them and get better.

In this game specifically, there are SO many tools available to you that weren't all there in the past. You have actual frame data, constant Youtube combo and tech finds, mind game tips, etc. Explore those options as well the best you can. Watch some high level gameplay and recorded tournament matches. Do the same practice you're already doing and make sure that you don't drop a combo when it counts mid game. Make sure not to forget your punishers and the different character hitboxes you need to get used to... there are also certain character matchups that will be different.
 

Vslayer

Kurses in moose
Premium Supporter
You need to find a training partner, someone skilled who will play long sets with you. Improving really lies on playing against other people that you will have fun playing with and someone who will give you tips too.
 

CrimsonShadow

Administrator and Community Engineer
Administrator
I made a huge post the other day on this topic that probably applies to you:


Goes through a bunch of aspects of getting better in detail, broken into 3 categories.
 
Thanks a ton for the replies everyone! Some really awesome stuff to mull over here. I think I'm going to start by hopping in online more often and just learn through getting my butt kicked for a while.
 

Dreamcatcher

EFL Founder
Lately I’ve been playing Juggs here and there, and the guy has been a beast at anything I’ve played him. So I do agree with the finding a partner to play long sets with because that’s pretty much what I’m doing. I like playing randoms to see what else everyone knows that I haven’t seen yet, but with that you risk running into complete d-bags.
 

Under_The_Mayo

Master of Quanculations
Premium Supporter
Go into practice mode and set the AI to mash low pokes. Practice against fight that and how to counter it. It's something you'll have to get past, in any fighting game. A skilled player can sniff out an inexperienced player and just low poke them to death. Get good against it, and you'll naturally start leveling up your counter poking, your whiff punishing, and your hit confirming. Make the AI randomly block while it's mashing, and that when when you hit him, you'll be able to practice hit confirming into combos or stopping your string.
 
Hey everyone,

Just decided to pop in here to hopefully get a little direction on how to improve my game. I'm sort of at the point with my play where I'm getting the fundamental mechanics of how to string combos together, a little about what's safe and what's not, and academically what some of the common terms mean and why they're important (footsies, zoning, 50/50, etc.). I'm starting to see the "other side" of fighting games where I can appreciate mindgames between skilled players, but I'm just having trouble figuring out how to get to a level of play that I can meaningfully participate in that. I know that getting into practice mode and grinding out big combo strings isn't going to get me very far, so what kind of things can I work on to help build a more practical skillset?

Really grateful for anyone's insight :) Cheers!
 

Mandolore1123

Man of Science Who Wields the Living Lightning
Play play play. I like to take a bit of time in between matches to reflect on why I lost. Was there a combo I dropped? (execution/nerves) Did I make a wrong read? (player tendencies/reactions) Was I simply outplayed? (experience) In MK11 I can probably pinpoint my weaknesses more clearly than before because many things have clear counters behind them. I kept missing my u3s because the opponent always jumped on my wake-up, so I use my u2 next time (it still whiffed because Raiden's u2 isn't that good at catching neutral jumps but you get the point). Don't let losing get you down. Fighting games are hard, but it rewards you when you put in the work. :) Just don't give up.